Sociology Index

Urban Sociology

Urbanism

The city and the metropolitan region are places where macro social trends materialize. We can include trends such as globalization and information technology. What are the challenges for urban sociology? We are seeing a paradigm shift in urban sociology. Urban sociology has challenged human ecology. New Urban Sociology began in Europe at the beginning of the 1970s and then spread to the United States. The story of the new urban sociologists is the story of members of the same generation who, dissatisfied with the development of theory in their field, developed a distinct approach to urban problems. Urban sociology also covers Urban Gentrification which is a process of change in the social and economic condition of urban neighborhoods.

MSU Center for Urban Affairs Community and Economic Development Program (CEDP) Committed to applying knowledge to address the needs of society, primarily urban communities. To facilitate the use of university and community resources to address urban issues that enhance the quality of life.

Urban Institute - Our mission: the Urban Institute gathers data, conducts research, evaluates programs, offers technical assistance overseas, and educates Americans on social and economic issues.

Urban Land Institute (ULI) - A nonprofit education and research institute that is supported and directed by its members. Its mission is to provide responsible leadership in the use ofland in order to enhance the total environment.

The Thoreau Institute - Urban Growth and Transportation Studies.

The New Urban Sociology Meets the Old - Rereading Some Classical Human Ecology 
David A. Smith, University of California, Irvine 
A basic paradigm shift in urban sociology has occurred: The new urban sociology has challenged and largely supplanted human ecology. The common perception that the two approaches are totally antithetical and incompatible has created a crisis in urban sociology. The author reevaluates some earlier ecological writings in light of the basic assumptions of the new urban sociology. Roderick McKenzie's often ignored writings show a striking affinity to tenets of the new urban sociology. Urban ecologists' claims are challenged by their own intellectual ancestors, and areas of conceptual continuity and overlap should lead to more dialogue and less theoretical polarization.

Urban Sociology Beyond the Theoretical Debate of the Seventies - Enzo Mingione 
This article reconstructs the theoretical history of urban sociological studies with particular attention to the critical debate of the seventies.

Debates and Developments - The future of urban sociology: report of joint sessions of the British and American Sociological Associations, Beth Perry & Alan Harding 
This article reports on two joint sessions of the British and American Sociological Associations held during the course of 2001 as a first step toward more structured dialogue and debate between the two national associations. Drawing on the comments of a number of leading academics on both sides of the Atlantic, this paper presents a series of discussions about the role and future of urban sociology. It explores the challenges and opportunities offered to urban sociology by increasing interdisciplinarity and multidisciplinarity in the field of urban studies as a whole. It then explores the role of sociology in understanding the relationship between contemporary processes of globalization and urban change and the degree to which this constitutes a new dynamic core of sociological theory and research. The paper reveals that there are a variety of alternative futures for urban sociology and there would appear to be little agreement on one specific route, nor on how to get there. Urban sociology continues to face a variety of challenges and more debate on its future trajectory is clearly needed.

Urban Sociology: A Trend Report - Rosemary Mellor 
The paper reviews the disintegration of urban sociology as a recognisable domain of study in the early 1980s and its development as urban studies - an interdisciplinary research field with global reference and infinite scope. At the same time there was a re-entry of the `local' and more specifically the `urban' into the sociological mainstream as there was greater awareness of uneven development, the particularity of local experience and the possibilities of mobilisation around local issues. In particular there was awareness that `race' politics was also an `urban' politics.

New frontiers facing urban sociology at the Millennium - Sassen S.
Abstract: The article examines some of the major challenges facing urban sociology at century's end given its traditions and lineages. These challenges arise out of the intersection of major macrosocial trends and their particular spatial patterns. The city and the metropolitan region emerge as one of the strategic sites where these macrosocial trends materialize and hence can be constituted as an object of study. Among these trends are globalization and the rise of the new information technologies, the intensifying of transnational and translocal dynamics, and the strengthening presence and voice of specific types of socio-cultural diversity.

Internal Colonialism in Thailand - Primate City Parasitism Reconsidered 
Bruce London, Department of Sociology Mary Washington College Fredericksburg, Virginia 
This paper contributes to the development of a more "political" comparative urban sociology by focusing on the role of intergroup power relationships in the creation and maintenance of regional/spatial inequalities in Thailand.

“Placing” Health in an Urban Sociology: Cities as Mosaics of Risk and Protection 
Fitzpatrick K.M.; LaGory M.
Abstract: Central to urban sociology is the assumption that place matters. Yet, urban sociology has virtually ignored the role of place in understanding a critical aspect of personal and collective well-being. This article attempts to synthesize major sociological theories of health, within an urban ecological framework, in an effort to provide insight into how the distinct spatial qualities of neighborhoods impact the health risks, beliefs, and behaviors of their residents.

New Urban Sociology in Japan: the changing debates - Kazutaka Hashimoto
Abstract: New Urban Sociology began in Europe at the beginning of the 1970s and then spread to the United States. This article examines the changing debates that have occurred in New Urban Sociology since its introduction to Japan in the late 1970s. The twenty years since its introduction from the West can be divided into three stages. The first covers the period from 1977 to 1985, when French urban sociology, particularly Manuael Castells' theory of the state, was highly influential. The second stage, from 1986 to 1992, focused on theories of urban social movements and the concept of global city in a context of urban renewal in Japan's major cities. The third stage, from 1992 to the present, is characterized by a transformation of New Urban Sociology into a sociological theory of space under globalization that has been heavily influenced by the work of David Harvey. Copyright Joint Editors and Blackwell Publishers Ltd 2002.

Radical Intellectuals: What Happened to the New Urban Sociology?
Aleksandra Sasha Milicevic
Abstract: This article is about the rise and fall of radicalism among 'new urban sociologists' during the 1960s and 1970s. First, I analyze the social and theoretical developments of that time and demonstrate the novelty of the questions that the new urban sociologists posed. Second, I examine the features of the practical engagements and motivations of the members of this group and show how they changed over time. Finally, I discuss the processes of institutionalization of this group. The story of the new urban sociologists is the story of members of the same generation who, dissatisfied with the development of theory in their field, developed a distinct approach to urban problems.

Urban Sociology. Curriculum Bulletin. Grade 12.
Abstract: The focus of the urban sociology teaching guide for grade 12 is on the effect of urbanization upon four of the major social institutions: familial, governmental, economic, and educational. An overall educational objective is to prepare students for developing rational solutions to problems confronting urban society. Objectives are stated in behavioral terms for each of the five units. Through enumeration of content, suggested activities, and resource material, the guide recommends a proven roadway to reach the objectives.

Urban Sociology Journals

International Journal of Urban and Regional Research.

Living Room Urban Ecology Magazine.

Radical Urban Theory: Writings on the Modern Urban Condition

Journal of Urban Affairs.

Journal of Urban Design.

Progress in Planning - The Progress in Planning explores advances in planning from an interdisciplinary perpsective, covering a wide range of topics including land use, design and behavior, spatial planning, environmental issues and urban form.

Urban Studies - The Urban Studies explores advances and issues in urban and regional planning, design and analysis drawing on a number of disciplines including geography, economics, sociology and public policy.

Geographical Journal
The Geographical Journal is the publication of the Royal Geographical Society publishing geographical research into cultures, economies and environments.

Journal of Environmental Planning and Management
The Journal of Environmental Planning and Management - planning and management of the environment including applied research, the application of new approaches and techniques, and the evaluation of policy and practice.

Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning
The Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning provides a forum for the critical analysis of environmental policy and planning from a political, social, economic, legal, cultural, aesthetic or planning perspective.

Journal of the American Planning Association
The Journal of the American Planning Association publishes current research on planning and urban development including cutting-edge research with practical application along with an archive of full text and graphics of Journal articles.

Journal of Urban Affairs
The Journal of Urban Affairs is a multidisciplinary journal devoted to articles that address contemporary urban issues and is directed toward an audience that includes practitioners, policy makers, scholars, and students.

Journal of Urban Design
The Journal of Urban Design explores issues, challenges and opportunities in the field of urban design and its impact on the quality of the built environment from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Journal of Urban Economics
The Journal of Urban Economics publishes papers of great scholarly merit on a wide range of topics and employing a wide range of approaches to urban economics.

Journal of Urban Planning and Development
The Journal of Urban Planning and Development explores the the application of civil engineering to urban planning aspects such as area-wide transportation, the coordination of planning and programming of public works and utilities, and the development and redevelopment of urban areas.

Land Degradation & Development
The Land Degradation & Development is devoted to Land Degradation, Promotion of Ecological Sustainability, Sustainable Land Management, Socioeconomic Implications for Sustainability and Development.

Landscape and Urban Planning
The Landscape and Urban Planning explores the relationships among landscape, planning and urban design from an interdisciplinary approach, looking at how landscape decisions are made and how they impact the market.

Our Planet
The Our Planet publishes the United Nations Environment Programme s flagship magazine for environmentally sustainable development.

Planning
The Planning offers news and analyses of events in planning (including suburban, rural, and small town planning, environmental planning, neighborhood revitalization, economic development, social planning, and urban design.

Planning Perspectives
The Planning Perspectives is an international journal the explores planning and the environment, publishing historical and prospective articles on the planning process and implementation.

Planning Practice & Research
The Planning Practice & Research explores various dimensions of planning with increasing attention on the distinctive features of planning practice and policy in different countries.

Planning Theory and Practice
The Planning Theory and Practice encourages development of theory and practice in spatial planning, and encourages the development of a spatial dimension in other areas of public policy.

Economics of Planning
The Economics of Planning explores economic analysis and policy making for the development and integration of transition economies; of 2002, it incorporates`MOCT-MOST: Economic Policy in Transitional Economies.

Geographical Analysis
The Geographical Analysis publishes mathematical and nonmathematical articulations of geographical theory, and statements and discussions of the analytic paradigm.

Urban Sociology - Bibliography

Gottdiener, Mark (1994). The New Urban Sociology. NY: McGraw-Hill.

Macionis, J.J., & Parrillo, V.N. (1998). Cities and Urban Life. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Wilson, W. J. (1987). The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy. Chicago, Il: University of Chicago Press.

Streetwise by Elijah Anderson, University of Chicago Press 1990.

Free Enterprise City by Joe Feagin, Rutgers University Press 1988.

Peter Hall. 1988. Cities of Tomorrow: An Intellectual History of Urban Planning and Design in the Twentieth Century. NY: Basil Blackwell.

Peter Hall. 1998. Cities and Civilization. NY: Random House.

Lewis Mumford. 1961. The City in History: Its Origins, Its Transformation, and Its Prospects. New York: Harcourt, Brace. Chapter 12: The Structure of Baroque Power.

John Landis 1997. A Choice Agenda. Fifty Years of City and Regional Planning at U.C. Berkeley. Berkeley. NSQ Press.

Cities of Tomorrow: An Intellectual History of Urban Planning and Design in the Twentieth Century. New York: Basil Blackwell.

Peter Hall. 1998. Cities and Civilization. New York: Random House.

Friedrich Engels. 1845. The Great Towns, reprinted from American Social Science Association, in Richard T. LeGates and Frederic Stout, eds., The City Reader (1996). New York: Routledge.

 

Jon Peterson. 1983. The Impact of Sanitary Reform upon American Urban Planning, 1840-1890. in Donald A. Krueckeberg, editor, Introduction to Planning History in the United States. New Brunswick, NJ: Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University.

Space, Knowledge and Power (Interview Conducted with Paul Rabinow) in Neil Leacf ed., Rethinking Architecture: A Reader in Cultural Theory.
London: Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd.

Leonnie Sandercock. 1998. Making the Invisible Visible. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Cities of Tomorrow: An Intellectual History of Urban Planning and Design in the Twentieth Century. New York: Basil Blackwell.

Kenneth Jackson. 1985. Crabgrass Frontier. New York: Oxford Press.

Clifton Hood. 1992. Subways, Transit, Politics, and Metropolitan Spatial Expansion. in David Ward and Olivier Zunz, eds. The Landscape of Modernity: New York City, 1900-1940. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press.

Transportation and Urban Form: Stages in the Spatial Evolution of the American Mettropolis. in Susan Hanson, ed., The Geography of Urban Transportation. New York: Guilford.

Manuel Castells. 1996. The Space of Flows. originally published as Chapter 6 in The Rise of the Network Society. Cambridge: Blackwell.

Ebenezer Howard. 1898. “Author’s Introduction” and “The Town-Country Magnet.” pp. 345-53, reprinted from Garden Cities of To-morrow, in Richard T. LeGates and Frederic Stout, eds., The City Reader (1996). New York: Routledge.

Frank Lloyd Wright. 1935. “Broadacre City: A New Community Plan.” reprinted from Architectural Record, in Richard T. LeGates, New York: Routledge.

Le Corbusier. 1929. “A Contemporary City.” reprinted from The City of Tomorrow and its Planning, in Richard T. LeGates, New York: Routledge.

Eugenie Ladner Birch. 1983. Radburn and the American Planning Movement: The Persistence of an Idea. in Donald Kruekeberg, ed., Introduction to Planning History in the United States. New Brunswick: CUPR Press.

Todd Bressi. 1994. Planning the American Dream. in Peter Katz, The New Urbanism. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and The Decline of the American Dream. New York: Northpoint Press.

The Progressives and the Slums: Tenement House Reform in New York City, 1890-1917. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Susan Wirka. 1996. The City Social Movement: Progressive Women Reformers and Early Social Planning. in Planning the 20th Century American City, Mary Corbin Sies and Christopher Silver, eds. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

The Myth of Marginality: Urban Poverty and Politics in Rio de Janeiro. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Dreaming the Rational City. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Marc Weiss. 1987. The Rise of the Community Builders: The American Real Estate Industry and Urban Land Planning. New York: Columbia University Press.

Regulating the Landscape: Real estate values, city planning, and the 1916 zoning ordinance. in David Ward and Oliver Zunz, eds., The Landscape of Modernity. New York: The Russell Sage Foundation.

Christopher Silver. 1997. The Racial Origins of Zoning in American Cities. in June Manning Thomas and Marsha Ritzdorf, eds., Urban Planning and the African American Community. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

The Suburbanization of the United States. New York: Oxford University Press.

Sustainability and Cities: Overcoming Automobile Dependence. Washington, D.C. : Island Press.

Wilson, William H. 1983. Moles and Skylarks. in in Donald Krueckeberg, ed., Introduction to Planning History in the United States. New Brunswick: CUPR Press.

Robert Fishman. 1992. The Regional Plan and the Transformation of the Industrial Metropolis. in David Ward and Oliver Zunz, eds., The Landscape of Modernity. New York: The Russell Sage Foundation.

Marc Weiss. 1987. The Rise of the Community Builders: The American Real Estate Industry and Urban Land Planning. New York: Columbia University Press.

A Socialist Housing Alternative for the United States. In Rachel Bratt, Chester Hartman, and Ann Meyerson, eds., Critical Perspectives on Housing. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

The Origins and Legacy of Urban Renewal. in Pierre Clavel and John Forester, editors, Urban and Regional Planning in an Age of Austerity. New York: Pergamon.

Herbert Gans. 1968. People and Plans: Essays on Urban Problems and Solutions. New York: Basic Books.

Jane Jacobs. 1961. The Death and Life of Great American Cities. New York: Random House.

Bernard Frieden and Lynne B. Sagalyn. 1989. Downtown, Inc.: How America Rebuilds Cities. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Carl Abbott. 1996. Five Strategies for Downtown: Policy Discourse and Planning since 1943. in Planning the 20th Century American City, Mary Corbin Sies and Christopher Silver, eds. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Alan Altshuler 1983. The Intercity Freeway. in Donald A. Krueckeberg, ed., Introduction to Planning History in the United States. New Brunswick: CUPR Press.

Lisa Peattie. 1987. Planning: Rethinking Ciudad Guyana. Ann Arbor. The University of Michigan Press.

Oscar Lewis. 1966. The Culture of Poverty. Scientific American.

Robert Halpern. 1995. Rebuilding the Inner City. New York: Columbia University Press.

Alice O’Connor. 1999. Swimming Against the Tide: A Brief History of Federal Policy in Poor Communities. in Ronald Ferguson and Edward Dickens, eds., Urban Problems and Community Development. Washington, D.C.: Brookings University Press.

June Manning Thomas. 1997. Model Cities Revisited: Issues of Race and Empowerment. in June Manning Thomas and Marsha Ritzdorf, eds., Urban Planning and the African American Community. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Robert Gottlieb. 1993. Forcing the Spring: The Transformation of the American Environmental Movement. Washington, D.C.: Island Press.

Ian McHarg and Frederick Steiner. 1998. To Heal the Earth: Selected Writings of Ian L. McHarg. Washington, D.C. Island Press.

Michael Porter. 1995. The Competitive Advantage of the Inner City. Harvard Business Review (May-June).

Urban Sociology - Syllabus

URBAN SOCIOLOGY THEORIES. Urban sociology syllabus. Urban sociology course documents: University of Chicago is the origin of Urban Sociology in the United States - hosting.uaa.alaska.edu

URBAN -SOCIOLOGY SYLLABUS - ucalgary.ca

Buffalo University Syllabus - Will examine social aspects of past, contemporary and future city life such as neighboring and community in the city, the economics of the city, and urban political issues. Sociological concepts of status systems, race relations, deviant behavior, mass culture, is helpful.
Required reading:
1- The New Urban Sociology by Mark Gottdiener, McGraw-Hill 1994.
2- Streetwise by Elijah Anderson, University of Chicago Press 1990.
3- Free Enterprise City by Joe Feagin, Rutgers University Press 1988.

Northwest Missouri State University
COURSE RATIONALE
Approximately 80% of the U.S. population resides in urban areas. This course will examine the structure of urban areas and the processes occurring in these areas. By studying these issues it will provide students with a better understanding of individuals and social-structure.

TEXTBOOK - Gottdiener, Mark (1994). The New Urban Sociology. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Syllabus - Department of Sociology - Saginaw Valley State University - svsu.edu/~hinton/urbansyllabus.htm

Required Texts:
Macionis, J. J., & Parrillo, V. N. (1998). Cities and Urban Life. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
Wilson, W. J. (1987). The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy. Chicago, Il: University of Chicago Press.

SO 303 Urban Sociology - Wiggins, Cleon - Independence
KC Accelerated - Park University
COURSE TEXTBOOK: The Urban World, 7th edition, John Palen, McGraw-Hill publishers

COURSE DESCRIPTION
A study of the development of the city and of the social characteristics of urbanization, ecology, social processes, group relations, and selected urban problems.

GOALS OF THE COURSE
The goal of the course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of concepts surrounding the development of urban cities in the United States. This course will also aim to better prepare students to understand, anticipate and deal with the myriad of issues facing urban areas in this country.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
After completing this course, students should have a solid understanding of the complexities facing urban communities today, how many of the issues developed, their impact on surrounding communities, and how best to deal with those issues and concerns, particularly as they affect the residents.

Books On Urban Sociology

Beyond Metropolis : The Planning and Governance of Asia's Mega-Urban Regions
Book by Aprodicio A. Laquian

Gender And Planning: A Reader Book by Susan S. Fainstein, Lisa J. Servon (Editors)

Globalizing Taipei: The Political Economy Of Spatial Development (Planning History and the Environment Series) Urban Sociology Book by Reginald Yin-Wang Kwok (Editor)

Partnerships In Urban Planning: A Guide For Municipalities Book by Nabeel Hamdi, Michael Majale

Planning World Cities : Globalization, Urban Governance and Policy Dilemmas (Planning, Environment, Cities) Urban Sociology Book by Peter Newman, Andrew Thornley

The Most Segregated City In America: City Planning And Civil Rights In Birmingham, 1920-1980 Book by Charles E. Connerly

Designing Social Innovation: Planning, Building, Evaluating Urban Sociology - Bob Martens

How to Think About Social Problems: American Pragmatism and the Idea of Planning (Contributions in Political Science) Urban Sociology Book by Hilda Blanco.