Sociology Index -

Stratification

Stratification is the condition of being stratified. Stratification is a configuration that is borrowed from the geological word strata. Stratification in society refers to the social structure or structure of society and the way individuals are arranged in divisions that lead to a kind of hierarchy in which power and wealth are divided unequally.

In mathematics, stratification is any consistent assignment of numbers to predicate symbols so that a unique formal interpretation of a logical theory exists. Stratification is useful for guaranteeing unique interpretation of Horn clause theories. Stratification has been used by W V Quine to address Russell's paradox.

Archaeological stratification or sequence is the superimposition of units of stratigraphy. Excavation techniques are based on stratigraphic principles.

Atmospheric stratification includes five main layers: Exosphere, Thermosphere, Mesosphere, Stratosphere and Troposphere.

Population stratification is the mixture of individuals from heterogeneous genetic backgrounds. In population stratification, ethnicity acts as a surrogate for the true risk factor, which may be environmental or genetic.

Social stratification lies at the core of society and sociology. Social inequality is a fundamental aspect of virtually all social processes, and a person's position in the stratification system is the most consistent predictor of his or her behavior, attitudes, and life chances. Social stratification is a social division of individuals into various hierarchies of wealth, status and power. There is disagreement about how to describe stratification systems, some sociologists favour the concept of class and others discuss status differentiations.

International Stratification and Mobility File (ISMF) is a collection of standardized sample survey data with information on social stratification and social mobility, in particular respondent's and parent's social statuses (education, occupation). The data set is created and maintained by Harry B.G. Ganzeboom at Utrecht University, in collaboration with Donald J. Treiman and Elisabeth Stephenson, University of California-Los Angeles. Access to these data can only be obtained by request, but some of the resources used for creating the ISMF are open for public access.

Global Stratification: World Hunger Year - WHY attacks root causes of hunger and poverty by promoting effective and innovative community-based solutions which create self-reliance, economic justice, and food security.

The CAMSIS project is an internationally comparative assessment of the structures of social interaction and stratification across a number of countries. At its core lies the construction - and dissemination - of occupational scales for each constituent country. The scale values represent an occupational unit's relative position within the national order of social interaction and stratification.