Sociology Index

Poland, Polish Traditions & Culture

Social Customs, Traditions

Sharing the Bread, Salt and Wine at a Polish Wedding

The sharing of the bread, salt and wine is an old Polish tradition. The parents of the bride and groom, greet the newly married couple with bread, which is lightly sprinkled with salt and a goblet of wine. With the bread, the parents are hoping that their children will never hunger or be in need. With the salt, they are reminding the couple that their life may be difficult at times, and they must learn to cope with life's struggles. With the wine, they are hoping that the couple will never thirst and wish that they have a life of good health, and good cheer and share the company of many good friends.

On a small table in front of the main table should be a tray with the following: a small dish of salt, 2 small slices of rye bread and a glass of wine. When everyone is ready, the Master of Ceremonies should read the prescribed text as the ceremony is conducted.

The parents sprinkle the bread with salt and give it to both of the newlyweds to eat. The bread represents the parents hope that their children will never experience hunger or need, the salt reminds the couple that their life may be difficult at times and they must learn together to cope with life's struggles.

The parents now present the glass of wine to the Bride and Groom for each of them to drink. With the wine, the parents hope that they will never thirst and that they will have a life of good health and cheer and share the company of many good friends.

The parents now join in kissing the bride and groom as a welcome to the family and as a sign of their love and unity."

Christmas
A long-time tradition in Poland during the Christmas season is th building of "Szopki" (pronounced shop-key), which are elaborate form of the Nativity scene. This tradition started back in the 13th century in Krakow, Poland, and remains an annual tradition whereas major prizes are awarded for the most elaborately decorated and designed Szopki.

The Wigilia is a meatless meal, no doubt the result of a long-time Church mandate that a strict fast and abstinence be observed on this day before Christmas. Although the Church laws have been revised and permit meat to be eaten on this day, the traditional meal remains meatless.

After the meal the members of the family sing Polish Christmas Carols called the koledy while the children wait impatiently around the Christmas tree or choinka for the gifts to be exchanged.

Aside from the beautiful Wigilia, the Polish people have a number of other traditions that they practice throughout the Christmas season.

Polish Christmas Carols or koledy are numerous and beautiful, especially when sung in Polish parishes at the Christmas Eve Mass. This Mass is called the Pasterka, which means the Shepherds Watch, and there is popular belief in Poland that while the congregation is praying, peace descends on the snow-clad, sleeping earth and that during that holy night, the humble companions of men - the domestic animals - assume voices. But only the innocent of heart may hear them.

On the feast of the Epiphany, the priest and the organist visit the homes, bless them and write over their doors the initials of the three wise men, KMB (Kasper, Melchior and Balthazar), in the belief that this will spare the homes from misfortune.

The Christmas season closes on February 2, known as Candlemas Day. On that day, people carry candles to church and have them blessed for use in their homes during storms, sickness and death.