Sociology Index

OCCUPATIONAL CRIME

Blue-collar Crime, Pink-collar Crime, Conventional Crime, Corporate Crime,

OCCUPATIONAL CRIME is white-collar crime committed by an individual or group of individuals exclusively for personal gain. The distinction between this occupational crime and organizational Crime is subtle. Occupational crime is committed by those in all walks of life, using their legitimate employment as an opportunity for crime.

Though the term "White-Collar Crime" is sometimes used to describe this type of illegal activity. A definition of occupational crime could include four subtypes:

  1. organizational occupational crime,
  2. state authority crime,
  3. professional occupational crime, and
  4. individual occupational crime.

Occupational Crime: Deterrence, Investigation, and Reporting in Compliance with Federal Guidelines - Ernest C. Blount

We all watched it happen: the demise of a powerhouse corporation caused by the irreverent and illegal actions of a handful of employees and executives. If it wasn't clear before the Enron/Arthur Andersen fiasco, it's painfully obvious now: Not only do we have to worry about our employees committing crimes against us as employers, we may even be held accountable for their actions! From governmental entities to partnerships to non-profit establishments - organizations can be indicted, criminally charged, prosecuted, and found guilty of criminal conduct.

If you haven't yet heard of the US Sentencing Commission, and more specifically Chapter Eight, Sentencing of Organizations, of the United States Sentencing Guidelines, it's time to learn. Occupational Crime: Deterrence, Investigation, and Reporting in Compliance with Federal Guidelines clearly explains how Chapter Eight sets forth punishment for organizations convicted of federal crimes, including felonies and Class A misdemeanors, and describes an effective compliance program and other incentives that can mitigate sanctions. In every venue, societal and governmental, abusive employee behavior and occupational crime is a costly and intricate issue demanding vigilant management attention and diverse remedies. Considering the uniqueness of each company, there is no "one size fits all" formula for an effective compliance program. Written by a 25-year veteran of corporate internal security and a certified fraud examiner, Occupational Crime helps you customize, no matter the size or type of company, a compliance program that will meet and exceed federal guidelines.

Occupational Crime - Gary S. Green (Editor)
This text departs from the problematic concept of "white-collar crime," which only emphasizes the status of the offender, by demonstrating that occupational crime is committed by those in all walks of life, using their legitimate employment as an opportunity for crime. Though the term "white-collar crime" is sometimes used to describe this type of illegal activity, Green presents a working definition of occupational crime and examines four subtypes: organizational occupational crime, state authority crime, professional occupational crime, and individual occupational crime. The text thoroughly describes major criminological theories, including sociology of law, and then applies them to specific kinds of occupational offenses throughout the book. Occupational Crime is a blending of academic theory, legal issues, anecdotes, case studies, empirical evidence research, and policy analysis from the vast literature on occupational crime.