Sociology Index

Narcissism

Narcissism from Narcissus in Greek myth was a pathologically self-absorbed young man who fell in love with his own reflection in a pool. Freud, who coined the name narcissism believed that some narcissism is an essential part of all of us from birth.

According to Andrew P. Morrison, a reasonable amount of healthy narcissism allows the individual's perception of his needs to be balanced in relation to others. Self-regulation in narcissists involves striving to make one’s self look and feel positive and important.

Acquired situational narcissism (ASN) is a form of narcissism that develops in late adolescence or adulthood, brought on by wealth, fame and the other trappings of celebrity. Coined by Robert B. Millman, Professor of Psychiatry, Cornell University.

Acquired situational narcissism differs from conventional narcissism in that it develops after childhood and is triggered and supported by the celebrity-obsessed society.

High levels of narcissism can manifest themselves as a pathological form as narcissistic personality disorder [NPD], whereby the patient overestimates his or her abilities and has an excessive need for admiration and affirmation. Narcissistic personality disorder is a condition defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

According to Freud, the love of the parents for their child and their attitude toward their child could be seen as a revival and reproduction of their own narcissism.

The Ego Revisited - Understanding and Transcending Narcissism 
Karen M. Peoples, Ph.D., California Institute of Integral Studies
Bert Parlee, M.A. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, Vol. 31.
While recognizing the complex interweave of prepersonal, personal, and transpersonal dimensions of narcissism, the usefulness of various meditation practices adapted to the client's structural organization is examined.