Sociology Index

Community Crime Prevention

Community crime prevention is a general category of prevention strategies which focus on the community itself. This general category of community crime prevention includes strategies such as ‘developmental crime prevention’, ‘effective guardianship’ or ‘situational crime prevention’.

Community crime prevention programs are based on the idea that private citizens should play a critical role in preventing crime in their communities. Community crime prevention includes media anti-drug campaigns, silent observer programs, and neighborhood dispute resolution programs.

The definition of the community crime prevention program restricts its application to activities that include residents of a particular area who participate in efforts to stop crimes before they occur in that particular area. The belief that citizens have a duty to curb deviant behavior, the basis of community crime prevention is as old as recorded history.

Community crime prevention may have started in England during the eighteenth century when playwright and novelist Henry Fielding mobilized people to addressing the root causes of crime and apprehending criminals.

The idea that law-abiding citizens could prevent crime in their communities through non-punitive means received popular responce in the United States in the 1930s due to the work of the Chicago School of Sociology.

Modern community crime prevention "partnership" schemes are based on scientific assessments and are centrally coordinated.

Brown, Mark, and Polk, Kenneth. "Taking Fear of Crime Seriously: The Tasmanian Approach to Community Crime Prevention." Crime and Delinquency 42, no. 3 (1996): 398–420.

Crawford, Adam. "Appeals to Community Crime Prevention." Crime, Law and Social Change 22, no. 2 (1995): 97–126.

The Crime Commission of New York State. Crime and the Community: A Study of Trends in Crime Prevention by the Sub-Commission on Causes and Effects of Crime. Albany, N.Y.: J.B. Lyon Company, 1930.

Farrington, David P. "Evaluating a Community Crime Prevention Program." Evaluation 3, no. 2 (1997): 157–173.

Grant, Jane; Lewis, Dan; and Rosenbaum, Dennis. "Political Benefits of Program Participation: The Case of Community Crime Prevention." Journal of Urban Affairs 10, no. 4 (1988): 373–385.

Hope, Tim. "Community Crime Prevention." In Building a Safer Society. Strategic Approaches to Crime Prevention. Crime and Justice: A Review of Research, 19. Edited by Michael Tonry and David P. Farrington. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1995. Pages 21–89.

Hsia, Heidi M., and Bownes, Donna. Title V: Community Crime Prevention Grants Program. Washington, D.C.: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Policy, 1998.

Lurigio, Arthur J., and Rosenbaum, Dennis P. "Evaluation Research in Community Crime Prevention: A Critical Look at the Field." In Community Crime Prevention: Does It Work? Edited by D. P. Rosenbaum. Beverly Hills, Calif.: Sage, 1986.

U.S. National Advisory Commission on Criminal Justice Standards. Community Crime Prevention. Washington, D.C.: The Commission, 1973.